edamame hummusThe first time I snacked on an edamame pod was when we lived in Asia (gosh, that’s over 11 years now!).  Mr. S and I were dining at a Japanese restaurant and while we waited for our food, the waiter brought us a bowl of cool, salted edamame pods. We had heard this snack was all the rage although the Japanese have been eating fresh, salted green soybeans out of their pods for over 1,000 years!  Guess it’s been a rage longer than we thought!

We had to ask our waiter how to eat edamame.  He smiled and said to squeeze the beans out of each pod.  They were so darn good we ordered another bowl! Edamame (immature green soybeans) are the quintessential snack to have with an ice-cold beer.  Its name is a combination of the words eda (meaning stem) and mame (meaning bean).  Green soybeans were called this because the pods were cooked while still on the stems, and sold in that form in Tokyo by street vendors.

Traditional hummus has to have chickpeas (aka garbanzo bean)—the Arabic word “hummus” literally translates to chickpeas.  However, you can think outside the chickpea hummus box!  I have made different versions (zucchini and broccoli hummus, for example) and one with a surprising twist, anchovies, and cilantro.  Experiment with other beans such a white kidney, butter, lima or peas.  Whatever substitute you use, make sure you have tahini or in a pinch, you can use peanut butter, fresh lemon or lime juice and olive oil.

1 1/2 cups fresh edamame, shelled (or frozen edamame)
2 to 3 tablespoon tahini (adjust according to taste)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 to 2 cloves garlic, chopped
3 tablespoons olive oil
a handful of cilantro leaves, roughly chopped (you can include some of the stems)
1 teaspoon ground cumin

If using frozen edamame, follow cooking instructions on the package. If you have fresh, follow these instructions.  Add the tahini, fresh lemon juice, olive oil, cilantro and garlic to a food processor. Blend.  Then add the edamame and cumin.  Blend until desired consistency. If too thick or chunky, run the food processor while drizzling in 1 to 2 tablespoons warm water until it reaches your desired consistency. Season with sea salt.  This will keep in the refrigerator for up to one week.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Serve this as a dip with bread, crackers or crudités.  For breakfast or lunch, spread the hummus on toast.  Enjoy!

edamame hummus
 
Author:
Recipe type: snack
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups fresh edamame, shelled (or frozen edamame)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoon tahini (adjust according to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 to 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • a handful of cilantro leaves, roughly chopped (you can include some of the stems)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
Instructions
  1. If using frozen edamame, follow cooking instructions on the package. If you have fresh, follow these instructions. Add the tahini, fresh lemon juice, olive oil, cilantro and garlic to a food processor. Blend. Then add the edamame and cumin. Blend until desired consistency. If too thick or chunky, run the food processor while drizzling in 1 to 2 tablespoons warm water until it reaches your desired consistency. Season with sea salt. This will keep in the refrigerator for up to one week.
  2. The Culinary Chase’s Note: Serve this as a dip with bread, crackers or crudités. For breakfast or lunch, spread the hummus on toast. Enjoy!

 

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