Vegetable – The Culinary Chase http://theculinarychase.com support local Thu, 10 Aug 2017 14:47:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 roasted radishes – so pretty! http://theculinarychase.com/2017/05/roasted-radishes-so-pretty/ Mon, 15 May 2017 19:07:49 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=13627 If you follow me on Instagram, you’ve most probably seen a few photos I’ve taken Saturday mornings at our local farmers’ market.  It’s a perfect way to connect with vendors who earn their living off the land and it’s inspiration for me deciding what to make for dinner that night.  I always find something new.  […]

The post roasted radishes – so pretty! appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

roasted radishes - so mild & deliciousIf you follow me on Instagram, you’ve most probably seen a few photos I’ve taken Saturday mornings at our local farmers’ market.  It’s a perfect way to connect with vendors who earn their living off the land and it’s inspiration for me deciding what to make for dinner that night.  I always find something new.  Hodgepodge Farm, I love that name, is one of the farmers we buy from.  Like the name indicates, their products range from a mixed produce garden, Shetland wool and lamb, maple syrup, and more from the Van Wagner family.  Their colourful radishes caught my eye.  I asked what variety they were and was told Easter egg.  So pretty I couldn’t resist buying!

I am the first to admit I was never a fan of radishes.  I found them too bitter/peppery and with a heated wasabi taste.  However, when radishes are this fresh and tiny, they somehow don’t taste as bitter or sharp.  Roasting softens their taste and texture.

radishes (ends trimmed, rinsed, and pat dry)
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
white balsamic vinegar

Preheat oven to 425f (220c).  In a bowl toss radishes with a splash of olive oil and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Roast on a tray 15 to 20 minutes or until slightly softened.  Remove from oven and add a splash of white balsamic vinegar.  Serve as finger food straight from the baking tray.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Allow to cool slightly before serving.  Enjoy!

The post roasted radishes – so pretty! appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
roasted vegetable stacks with goat cheese http://theculinarychase.com/2016/08/roasted-vegetable-stacks-goat-cheese/ Tue, 30 Aug 2016 18:38:34 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=12948 I am in veggie heaven with these roasted vegetable stacks and in one recipe I get the daily recommended servings of vegetables; my kind of dish.  Although the end of Summer means goodbye to warmer days (sigh), its departure signals the bounty of the harvest (yay!).  It’s the perfect time of the year to grab […]

The post roasted vegetable stacks with goat cheese appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

roasted veggie stacks with goat cheeseI am in veggie heaven with these roasted vegetable stacks and in one recipe I get the daily recommended servings of vegetables; my kind of dish.  Although the end of Summer means goodbye to warmer days (sigh), its departure signals the bounty of the harvest (yay!).  It’s the perfect time of the year to grab all the locally grown goodies from markets and farmers roadside stands.  The produce is so fresh you need little in the way of seasoning.  For this recipe, the key to making the vegetables stack on top of each other is size.  If they’re all similar in size, the balance will help the stacks stay upright and not slide off plus it’ll make it easier to cook and to serve.  Don’t worry if the stacks fall over when cooking. Just reassemble for presentation and no one will ever know the difference! If there’s any juice on the baking tray, use that to drizzle over the vegetable stacks.

Serves 2 to 4
1 to 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 to 4 garlic cloves finely chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 eggplant cut into four slices
1 orange bell pepper, quartered and deseeded
1 red onion cut into four slices
goat’s cheese
1 tomato cut into four slices
1 zucchini cut into 1/4″ slices
handful pine nuts (lightly toasted, optional)

Preheat oven to 200c (400f). Whisk together lemon juice, garlic, and oil in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Place eggplant and red bell pepper on a baking tray and drizzle with one-quarter of the lemon mixture. Toss to coat and bake 15 minutes or until tender.

Lightly brush a baking tray with olive oil.  Place a slice of red onion on the tray and evenly smear goat cheese over (like you would peanut butter).  Add tomato, zucchini, eggplant and red bell pepper. Drizzle with lemon mixture.  Lightly press down on the stack to secure – you can use a toothpick but not necessary.  Repeat process for other stacks. Bake 40 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Remove vegetable stacks and place on a plate. Scatter pine nuts and top with goat’s cheese. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:   I found serving this dish at room temperature enhanced the flavors of the vegetables. Enjoy!

The post roasted vegetable stacks with goat cheese appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
whole roasted cauliflower with a parsley sauce http://theculinarychase.com/2016/03/whole-roasted-cauliflower/ Thu, 31 Mar 2016 18:06:23 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=12276 Do you remember eating cauliflower when you were a kid?  I do.  My favorite was smothered in my mom’s homemade cheddar cheese sauce.  Come to think of it, I don’t think I really liked cauliflower; I loved the cheese sauce!  Fast forward to my adult years and I have served cauliflower many ways and fondly […]

The post whole roasted cauliflower with a parsley sauce appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

whole roasted cauliflowerDo you remember eating cauliflower when you were a kid?  I do.  My favorite was smothered in my mom’s homemade cheddar cheese sauce.  Come to think of it, I don’t think I really liked cauliflower; I loved the cheese sauce!  Fast forward to my adult years and I have served cauliflower many ways and fondly enough, not smothered in cheese sauce.  I’ve roasted cauliflower pieces but never a whole roasted cauliflower – well, come to think of it, not strictly true.  Back in 2009 I baked a whole Romanesco cauliflower in a tomato sauce and that was a big hit.  There are recipes out there that suggest steaming the veggie first or parboiling it but I feel that’s more work than is needed.  The easiest is to chuck it in the oven, dressed with olive oil, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, and leave the magic to the roasting.  When it’s cooked, and this is personal to each individual, remove from oven and divvy it up or slather a sauce over it.  If you like the former, use my recipe…it’s the pièce de résistance.

You might stop dead in your tracks when you read there are anchovies in the dressing but fear not. The thought of adding anchovies to anything used to bother me until I took a cooking lesson from my lovely Italian friend, Francesca.  She would tell me, “my dear, you haven’t lived or experienced Italian food if you haven’t tasted anchovies!”.  That was 16 years ago; I am no longer a stranger to the small fish.  The flavor of anchovies shines best when tempered with other foods.

whole roasted cauliflower with a parsley sauce
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • 1 head of cauliflower
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • parsley sauce -
  • ¼ cup parsley, finely chopped
  • 1 or 2 cloves garlic (make into a paste – instructions in note)
  • 1 to 2 oil packed anchovies, minced
  • 1 teaspoon or more of lime or lemon juice
  • ¼ to ½ teaspoon dried chili pepper flakes
  • ¼ to ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400f (200c). Grab a cooking vessel large enough to hold the cauliflower. Remove any manky-looking leaves and cut the stem off to help balance the vegetable. Place cauliflower in vessel and smother with olive oil (use your hands to massage it all over) followed by a generous grinding of sea salt and black pepper. Move to oven and roast 60 minutes or longer depending on how soft you like it. Allow the cauliflower to rest a few minutes before serving.
  2. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauce. In a small bowl combine all ingredients except olive oil. Slowly add olive oil while stirring until emulsified. Cut chunks of the cauliflower and distribute among plates. Drizzle with sauce and serve.

 

whole cauliflowerroasted cauliflowerThe Culinary Chase’s Note:   To make garlic paste, chop garlic cloves and add a pinch of sea salt.  Using the flat side of a knife, push the salt into the garlic.  Repeat push and scrape movements back over garlic and within seconds you’ll see how the chopped garlic quickly turns into a paste.  Scrape up with the knife and add to the dressing.   Enjoy!

The post whole roasted cauliflower with a parsley sauce appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
Roasted Vegetables & Sausage http://theculinarychase.com/2015/04/roasted-vegetables-sausage/ http://theculinarychase.com/2015/04/roasted-vegetables-sausage/#comments Wed, 08 Apr 2015 16:00:18 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=10195  Looking for a Sunday-style roast but without the fuss?  As much as I adore a Sunday roast, it’s an all day thing or close to it.  Sure, you can leave the roast in the oven and putter around the house or go out for a quick lunch, but realistically, you need to be nearby to […]

The post Roasted Vegetables & Sausage appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

 vegetable sausage roastLooking for a Sunday-style roast but without the fuss?  As much as I adore a Sunday roast, it’s an all day thing or close to it.  Sure, you can leave the roast in the oven and putter around the house or go out for a quick lunch, but realistically, you need to be nearby to make sure all is going well.  And, perhaps that’s the whole purpose of a Sunday roast – to keep everyone at home.  It lends for more family time; chatting while the dinner is in prep mode.  For me, though, my kids are too far away for them to pop over for the afternoon.  Unless we have our friends over, it’s just the two of us so a chunk of meat has to be given careful consideration to make sure there’s no waste.  Last week I craved a roast dinner but on a week night.  I had some root vegetables and three Italian sausages in the fridge.  Roasted vegetables are a favorite in our home and sausage, well, who doesn’t like a good sausage?  The bonus side of this dish is one cooking vessel = less to clean up.

Sunchokes make a lovely potato substitute for this recipe.  Also known as Jerusalem artichokes, they are the knobby tuberous roots of a native North American plant from the sunflower family.  The root tastes a bit like an artichoke.  Eaten raw, they have a taste and crunch similar to a water chestnut while roasted the taste falls somewhere between that of a potato and a water chestnut. Roasting brings out a sweet, nutty flavor.

sunchokeServes 2
3 to 4 sausages
1 small onion, peeled and quartered
6 cloves of garlic (skin left on)
6 to 8 sunchokes, washed and quartered (amount will vary depending on size)
2 to 3 carrots, peeled and quartered (rainbow colored carrots, if you have)
1/2 bell pepper, sliced
handful cherry tomatoes
6 sprigs of fresh thyme
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

roast veggie & sausage

Preheat oven to 350f.  In a large roasting pan add all ingredients except for sausages, olive oil, and thyme. Add a generous splash of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Place sausages on top of the veggies along with fresh time.  Try not to crowd the veggies or they’ll end up steaming rather than roasting.  Place in the oven and roast for 30 minutes or until vegetables are soft or al dente.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: If you do use potatoes, parboil, drain and add to roasting pan.  Don’t be tempted to pierce the skins of the sausage, you’ll end up with dried out sausage meat.  Uniformed vegetable slices means uniformed cooking.  Roasted garlic develops a delicious sweet flavor and the raw garlic character is lost.  Squeeze the garlic out of its skin and distribute between plates.   Roast more garlic cloves and use in salad dressings, dips or spread on rustic bread and top with slices of tomato and fresh basil.  Enjoy!

Roasted Vegetables & Sausage
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Looking for a Sunday-style roast but without the fuss? Roasted vegetables are a favorite in our home and sausage, well, who doesn’t like a good sausage? The bonus side of this dish is one cooking vessel = less to clean up.
Author:
Recipe type: dinner
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 3 to 4 sausages
  • 1 small onion, peeled and quartered
  • 6 cloves of garlic (skin left on)
  • 6 to 8 sunchokes, washed and quartered (amount will vary depending on size)
  • 2 to 3 carrots, peeled and quartered (rainbow colored carrots, if you have)
  • ½ bell pepper, sliced
  • handful cherry tomatoes
  • 6 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • olive oil
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350f.
  2. In a large roasting pan add all ingredients except for sausages, olive oil, and thyme. Add a generous splash of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine. Place sausages on top of the veggies along with fresh time. Try not to crowd the veggies or they’ll end up steaming rather than roasting.
  3. Place in the oven and roast for 30 minutes or until vegetables are soft or al dente.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: If you do use potatoes, parboil, drain and add to roasting pan. Don’t be tempted to pierce the skins of the sausage, you’ll end up with dried out sausage meat. Uniformed vegetable slices means uniformed cooking. Roasted garlic develops a delicious sweet flavor and the raw garlic character is lost. Squeeze the garlic out of its skin and distribute between plates. Roast more garlic cloves and use in salad dressings, dips or spread on rustic bread and top with slices of tomato and fresh basil. Enjoy!

 

The post Roasted Vegetables & Sausage appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
http://theculinarychase.com/2015/04/roasted-vegetables-sausage/feed/ 1
Lentil and Vegetable Stew http://theculinarychase.com/2015/01/lentil-vegetable-stew/ Thu, 22 Jan 2015 22:03:17 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=9431 Stews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes.  It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.  Lentils are slow-burning, high-fiber, and lean protein food.  Lentils have an earthy, nutty flavor and […]

The post Lentil and Vegetable Stew appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

Lentil & Vegetable StewStews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes.  It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.  Lentils are slow-burning, high-fiber, and lean protein food.  Lentils have an earthy, nutty flavor and are a staple in my pantry.  Make this tonight, you’ll be glad you did!

Serves 4
olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic, chopped
4 cups hot vegetable stock
3/4 lb potatoes, peeled and diced
4 carrots, sliced
2 to 3 parsnips, sliced
2 tablespoons curry paste
1 cup red lentils, rinsed
small handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
plain yogurt, for topping

red lentilsHeat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan and cook onion and garlic over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally. Add potatoes, carrots and parsnips.  Turn up the heat and cook for 6-7 minutes, stirring, until the vegetables are golden. Stir in the curry paste, pour in vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, add the lentils, cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the lentils and vegetables are tender and the sauce has thickened. Stir in most of the coriander, season and heat for a minute or so. Top with yogurt and coriander.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Make sure vegetables are cut in similar size to ensure even cooking.  Enjoy!

Lentil and Vegetable Stew
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Stews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes. It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.
Author:
Recipe type: stew
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • ¾ lb potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 4 carrots, sliced
  • 2 to 3 parsnips, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons curry paste
  • 1 cup red lentils, rinsed
  • small handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan and cook onion and garlic over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add potatoes, carrots and parsnips, turn up the heat and cook for 6-7 minutes, stirring, until the vegetables are golden.
  3. Stir in the curry paste, pour in the stock and then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, add the lentils, cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the lentils and vegetables are tender and the sauce has thickened.
  4. Stir in most of the coriander, season and heat for a minute or so. Top with yogurt and coriander.
Notes
Make sure vegetables are cut in similar size to ensure even cooking. Enjoy!

 

The post Lentil and Vegetable Stew appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
Baked Vegetable Custard http://theculinarychase.com/2015/01/baked-vegetable-custard/ Mon, 12 Jan 2015 21:02:50 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=9346 Years ago I bought a book to hold all my scraps of paper that I scribbled recipes on or ones I cut from magazines and newspapers.  I remember, after the last recipe was glued down, how triumphant it felt to see my collection in one place.   The other day I went through one I started […]

The post Baked Vegetable Custard appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

Vegetable CustardYears ago I bought a book to hold all my scraps of paper that I scribbled recipes on or ones I cut from magazines and newspapers.  I remember, after the last recipe was glued down, how triumphant it felt to see my collection in one place.   The other day I went through one I started back in 2005.  I had forgotten these recipes.  The baked vegetable custard is one I made once before, most probably in 2005, and it’s a pity I forgot about it as it’s darn delicious and relatively easy to make.  As much as I like to view recipes online, I still enjoy the tactile nature of paper. For many, the word custard conjures up something sweet but not all custards are sweet.  Think of quiche and you have a savory custard tart or timbale.  These custards are elegant appetizers and are a shoe-in at your next dinner party.  Prepare them ahead of time and bake just before your friends arrive.

Serves 6
10 oz. baby spinach, washed
1 to 2 cloves of garlic, minced
extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups cooked (al dente) broccoli florets, chopped
1 small onion, minced
1/3 cup pancetta, diced
2 small zucchini, sliced
6 slices country bread
1 cup milk
2 eggs, lightly beaten
1/3 cup Parmesan, freshly grated
2 cups tomato sauce (homemade or purchased)

Preheat oven to 400f.

Cook the spinach over medium heat with the garlic and 1 tablespoon olive oil – just until the spinach softens.  Remove from heat and set aside.  Sauté onion and pancetta in 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add zucchini and after 2 minutes add spinach. Cover and cook over medium-high heat for 4 minutes. Remove cover, toss in broccoli florets and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Remove from heat. Soak bread in milk, squeeze dry and tear into small pieces. In a bowl, mix the bread, egg, sautéed vegetables and Parmesan. Stir until combined. Distribute the mixture between 6 buttered ramekins (or similar sized oven-proof containers) place in a baking dish filled halfway with warm water. Bake 50 minutes. Run a knife around the edges of the custard and invert onto a plate with a pool of hot tomato sauce.

custardThe Culinary Chase’s Note: Let cool 5 minutes before serving. Serve on a pool of hot tomato sauce or on a bed of mixed greens.  Enjoy!

Baked Vegetable Custard
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
These custards are elegant appetizers and are a shoe-in at your next dinner party. Prepare them ahead of time and bake just before your friends arrive.
Author:
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 10 oz. baby spinach, washed
  • 1 to 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups cooked (al dente) broccoli florets, finely chopped
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • ⅓ cup pancetta, diced
  • 2 small zucchini, sliced
  • 6 slices country bread
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ⅓ cup Parmesan, freshly grated
  • 2 cups tomato sauce (homemade or purchased)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400f.
  2. Cook the spinach over medium heat with the garlic and 1 tablespoon olive oil – just until the spinach wilts. Remove from heat and set aside. Sauté onion and pancetta in 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add zucchini and after 2 minutes add spinach. Cover and cook over medium-high heat for 4 minutes. Remove cover, toss in broccoli florets and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Remove from heat.
  3. Soak bread in milk, squeeze dry and tear into small pieces. In a bowl, mix the bread, egg, sautéed vegetables and Parmesan. Stir until combined.
  4. Distribute the mixture between 6 buttered ramekins (or similar sized oven-proof containers) place in a baking dish filled halfway with warm water. Bake 50 minutes. Run a knife around the edges of the custard and invert onto a plate with a pool of hot tomato sauce.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Let cool 5 minutes before serving. Serve on a pool of hot tomato sauce or on a bed of mixed greens. Enjoy!

 

The post Baked Vegetable Custard appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
Kohlrabi Slices http://theculinarychase.com/2014/09/kohlrabi-slices/ Fri, 26 Sep 2014 14:16:26 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=8439 For months I have passed by the vegetable section of my local food market and wondered what kohlrabi (German word for cabbage turnip) was.   The other day I finally picked up a bunch and decided to do a little research on this curious vegetable.  It’s an odd-looking thing and couldn’t get my head around […]

The post Kohlrabi Slices appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

kohlrabi slicesFor months I have passed by the vegetable section of my local food market and wondered what kohlrabi (German word for cabbage turnip) was.   The other day I finally picked up a bunch and decided to do a little research on this curious vegetable.  It’s an odd-looking thing and couldn’t get my head around how to use it.  At the local farmers’ market, I spoke to Jamie to see if he grew it or had tried it.  Although he doesn’t grow it (it takes up a lot of precious land) he said he’s enjoys it raw and cuts it into sticks to use as crudités.  Aha!  Now I am inspired.  This spherical vegetable is actually a cabbage, although it looks more like a white turnip.  The taste?  It reminds me of how broccoli stems taste but slightly sweeter and a bit juicy.  The health benefits of this veggie are impressive.  Kohlrabi has more vitamin C than oranges, a good source of B vitamins and minerals.  Its leaves, which taste a bit like turnip, are great in salads or spring greens so don’t throw them out.  Two varieties are either white or purple but I haven’t seen a purple kohlrabi yet.   When selecting kohlrabi, choose the ones that are medium to small-sized and heavy.  These will be young, sweet and tender.  I’ve made this dish twice now.  It’s so easy to make and let me tell you, the flavors are so flippin’ good!

Serves 2
1 kohlrabi, peeled and thinly sliced (a mandoline works well)
1 small clove of garlic, peeled and minced
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
extra-virgin olive oil
lemon juice and zest
2 anchovy fillets, packed in oil, minced

kohlrabiArrange kohlrabi slices on 2 plates. Sprinkle garlic and lemon zest over slices along with anchovies. Add a splash of lemon juice followed by olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Use a knife when peeling the kohlrabi and remove the dark green outer layer. The flesh of the vegetable will be white-yellow.  I’ll be roasting these in the coming weeks so stay tuned for my update and subsequent recipes.  Enjoy!

Kohlrabi Slices
 
Prep time
Total time
 
The taste? It reminds me of how broccoli stems taste but slightly sweeter and a bit juicy. The health benefits of this veggie are impressive. Kohlrabi has more vitamin C than oranges, a good source of B vitamins and minerals. Its leaves, which taste a bit like turnip, are great in salads or spring greens so don’t throw them out.
Author:
Recipe type: vegetarian
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 1 kohlrabi, peeled and thinly sliced (a mandoline works well)
  • 1 small clove of garlic, peeled and minced
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • lemon juice and zest
  • 2 anchovy fillets, packed in oil, minced
Instructions
  1. Arrange kohlrabi slices on 2 plates. Sprinkle garlic and lemon zest over slices along with anchovies. Add a splash of lemon juice followed by olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Use a knife when peeling the kohlrabi and remove the dark green outer layer. The flesh of the vegetable will be white-yellow. I’ll be roasting these in the coming weeks so stay tuned for my update and subsequent recipes. Enjoy!

 

The post Kohlrabi Slices appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
Roasted Hakurei Turnips http://theculinarychase.com/2014/08/roasted-hakurei-turnips/ http://theculinarychase.com/2014/08/roasted-hakurei-turnips/#comments Thu, 07 Aug 2014 18:50:13 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=7852 I am and have been for a long time enamored with local farmers’ markets.  For those who don’t know me, I grew up in the country where my parents grew their own vegetables and later on had chickens and pigs (hobby farm, of sorts).  As much as I liked being able to walk over to […]

The post Roasted Hakurei Turnips appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

Roasted Hakurei TurnipsI am and have been for a long time enamored with local farmers’ markets.  For those who don’t know me, I grew up in the country where my parents grew their own vegetables and later on had chickens and pigs (hobby farm, of sorts).  As much as I liked being able to walk over to the vegetable field (yep, it wasn’t a patch!) to pick or dig the veggies for the evening dinner, I did not like any of the work that went into growing and maintaining a vegetable garden.  I still don’t!

So, lucky for me, I can get my fresh fix by visiting a local farmers’ market.  Where I live there are two and while these markets carry similar produce and products, the Alderney Landing Farmers’ Market in Dartmouth is smaller and tends to attract interesting vendors.  Even though I’ve been going to this market for a while, there’s one vendor I somehow missed during the visits and I only noticed them last Saturday because their table was moved to the outside entrance.  I spoke to Jamie, who’s a full time nurse, from Off Beet Farm (I love this name) to get the lowdown on their 1-acre farm.  They offer food that is hand picked, pesticide-free, and bee friendly.  As I was chatting to him, I spotted his freshly foraged chanterelles and then I saw what I thought were white radishes but turns out they were Hakurei turnips.  Intrigued as well as puzzled, Jamie said they’re a Japanese turnip also known as salad turnip.  These little guys are sweet enough to eat raw.

Hakurei Turnips (aka Salad Turnip)

Hakurei Turnips (aka Salad Turnip) from Off Beat Farm

How to prepare them?  Well, some people eat them raw like a crudité, braised, sautéed in butter with a bit of miso paste, in a soup, coleslaw etc.  But I thought about roasting the Hakurei turnips.

Serves 2 as a side
2 bunches of Hakurei turnips, scrubbed
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
white balsamic vinegar

Hakueri TurnipsPreheat oven to 350f (180c).  Cut stems off but don’t throw out the leaves.  The leaves have a mild peppery taste and will be used in this dish.  Cut large turnips in half, and place on a roasting tray. Add a splash of olive oil and season with salt and pepper.  Roast 20 minutes or until slightly soft.  Allow to cool somewhat.  Meanwhile, toss the leaves of the turnips with a bit of extra-virgin olive oil and a splash of white balsamic vinegar.

To plate, divide leaves between plates and top with the turnips.  Serve immediately.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Eat these alone or with the leaves.  Enjoy!

5.0 from 1 reviews
Roasted Hakurei Turnips
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: vegetable
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 bunches of Hakurei turnips, scrubbed
  • olive oil
  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • white balsamic vinegar
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350f (180c). Cut stems off but don’t throw out the leaves. The leaves have a mild peppery taste and will be used in this dish. Cut large turnips in half, and place on a roasting tray. Add a splash of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast 20 minutes or until slightly soft. Allow to cool somewhat. Meanwhile, toss the leaves of the turnips with a bit of extra-virgin olive oil and a splash of white balsamic vinegar.
  2. To plate, divide leaves between plates and top with the turnips. Serve immediately.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Eat these alone or with the leaves. Enjoy!

 

The post Roasted Hakurei Turnips appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
http://theculinarychase.com/2014/08/roasted-hakurei-turnips/feed/ 5
How To Cook Fresh Peas http://theculinarychase.com/2014/07/cook-fresh-peas/ Mon, 14 Jul 2014 19:01:43 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=7457 I love recreating a food memory.  I grew up in the country where my parents had enough land to grow their own vegetables along with 2 pigs and 6 hens.  We didn’t have a farm per se, it was more of a hobby farm.  Looking back it was an interesting learning experience for me but […]

The post How To Cook Fresh Peas appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

how to cook fresh peasI love recreating a food memory.  I grew up in the country where my parents had enough land to grow their own vegetables along with 2 pigs and 6 hens.  We didn’t have a farm per se, it was more of a hobby farm.  Looking back it was an interesting learning experience for me but at the time, a vegetable garden (a large one at that!) and a few farm animals meant outside chores increased and that ate into my summer time fun.  When my siblings and I got older, we would help mom prepare the vegetables and shelling peas was one I did not mind doing.  I was at the Alderney Farmers’ Market on Saturday and spotted a bag of peas.  Seeing them I instantly recalled a dish my mom would make when the first round of vegetables were ready to eat – hodge podge – that’s what she called it.   Basically it’s fresh veggies such as peas, string beans, new potatoes and carrots.  Some cooks will make it more like a stew but the way my mom made it was very simple…once the veggies were cooked either boiled or steamed, drain, combined in a pot and add butter and milk (place over low heat until butter has melted and milk is warmed).  To prepare the fresh peas you need to shell them.  To shell, all you need to do is pull the stringy bit at the top and pull down.  Pry open the pod at the seam using your thumbs and run your finger down to clear out the peas.  The next step, how to cook fresh peas, is simple.

shelled peas

Add peas to a small pot and barely cover with water.

peasBring to a slow boil and cook 3 to 4 minutes.  Do not add salt to the water as this will toughen the peas.  Drain and return peas to the pot but don’t turn on the heat.  Add a knob of butter, sea salt and pepper and stir until butter melts.  Garnish, if you like, with freshly chopped mint.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  When picking your own peas, choose pods that are medium in size as the large ones can produce tougher peas and generally not a pleasant taste.  When shelling peas, taste one, it should be tender and sweet.  Try puréeing the cooked peas with garlic, pine nuts, touch of lemon juice, S&P, and spread this on a toasted slice of bread.  Enjoy!

Pry open the pod at the seam using your thumbsRead more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2090032_shell-peas.html
Pry open the pod at the seam using your thumbsRead more : http://www.ehow.com/how_2090032_shell-peas.html

The post How To Cook Fresh Peas appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>
Cedar Plank Grilled Mushroom Stacks http://theculinarychase.com/2013/06/cedar-plank-grilled-mushroom-stacks/ Fri, 21 Jun 2013 00:42:49 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=3483 John and I barbeque all year round and when Spring and Summer arrive, it’s full on.   Our barbeque gets used on a weekly basis so it’s not unusual to see me out on our back deck firing up the barbie.  I love it…less mess for me to clean up!  I’ve been noticing more and more […]

The post Cedar Plank Grilled Mushroom Stacks appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>

cedar plank grilled mushroom stacksJohn and I barbeque all year round and when Spring and Summer arrive, it’s full on.   Our barbeque gets used on a weekly basis so it’s not unusual to see me out on our back deck firing up the barbie.  I love it…less mess for me to clean up!  I’ve been noticing more and more these days that most food places I shop carry planks for grilling – some individual and some in packages carrying an assortment (cedar, birch, hickory or maple).  Plank grilling originates from the Native Americans from the Pacific Northwest who grilled salmon on open fires over cedar and alder.  The concept is by far not new but certainly merits consideration.

Serves 4

4 portobello mushrooms, cleaned and stems removed
2 medium-sized zucchini, sliced
2 medium-sized yellow summer squash, sliced
pesto
tomatoes, sliced
cedar planks
olive oil

Allow cedar plank to soak in water for at least an hour (longer if possible). If using a stainless steel plank saver then soak the plank for 30 minutes. On medium heat, grill portobello mushrooms gill side down, 3 to 5 minutes.  Remove and set aside. Lightly brush olive oil onto zucchini and summer squash slices. Season with salt and pepper. Place on grill for up to 5 minutes and turn. You want the slices to show some grill marks and the flesh to be slightly softened.

portobello mushroomsRemove cedar plank from water and pat dry. Place portobello mushroom (gill side up) on the cedar plank. Followed by zucchini slices, yellow summer squash slices, tomato slices, and pesto. Make sure bbq is at 350f and add plank. Cover with bbq lid and cook 10 minutes. Don’t worry if smoke is billowing out of the bbq – this is normal. The cedar smoke will infuse the veggies. Remove from bbq and serve on a plate and drizzle with olive oil.

Note:  After using, rinse the plank off with soap and water and let dry. Reuse the planks two or three times – if there’s wood left, you can use it. Crumble up charred planks over coals to use as smoking chips and choose planks that aren’t chemically treated.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: This was my first attempt at plank grilling and I liked it. I think I’ll experiment with salmon the next time.   Add freshly grated Parmesan to the portobello mushrooms before adding the vegetables.  Enjoy!

The post Cedar Plank Grilled Mushroom Stacks appeared first on The Culinary Chase.

]]>