stew – The Culinary Chase http://theculinarychase.com support local Tue, 13 Jun 2017 19:52:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 cioppino and a San Francisco mini trip http://theculinarychase.com/2017/03/cioppino-and-a-san-francisco-mini-trip/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 18:45:25 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=13480 During the first week in March, Mr. S and I were in San Francisco; he was attending GDC while I was a tourist for 5 days.  I had never been before and was eager to explore as much as possible and I did!  Each day was packed with something new.  We stayed in the Mission […]

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Italian American fish stew - cioppinoDuring the first week in March, Mr. S and I were in San Francisco; he was attending GDC while I was a tourist for 5 days.  I had never been before and was eager to explore as much as possible and I did!  Each day was packed with something new.  We stayed in the Mission District (so glad we did) and would walk to the Moscone Center every day.  Breakfast was in a different place each morning usually eating at establishments that promoted locally grown food.  Some of the memorable ones were Blue Bottle Coffee (the softest poached eggs on toast with avocado), Chow Food Bar (buttermilk pancakes to die for), and Tartine Bakery & Cafe (ham and swiss croissants that melted in your mouth).  I would have breakfast with Mr. S and then bid him farewell as he went on to the GDC.

Four Barrel coffee, Mission District

Popular tourist sights and local cuisine are always high on my list of things to do along with brushing up on local history.  This brings me to cioppino (chuh-pee-noh) – an Italian American fish stew.  While I didn’t have one of San Fran’s signature dishes while there, I did make it when we got home.  Thanks to Italian immigrants for this dish; they would bring home whatever was the catch of the day and make into a tomato based stew.  It’s easy to make and packed with flavour.

San Francisco’s vintage streetcars

 

 

top of Lombard Street which has 8 hairpin turns (Coit Tower in the background)

Use this recipe as a guide and change the amounts where you see fit.  It’s a forgiving dish so you can’t really mess it up.

Serves 4
1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced (can use a small onion, chopped)
good splash of olive oil
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon dried oregano
pinch or two crushed red pepper flakes
1 bay leaf
28 oz. can Italian tomatoes
1 cup bottled clam juice
1 cup water
1 cup white wine
1 lb. of clams
12 large shrimp, peeled
1 lb. firm white fish cut into bite-size chunks
1 lb. mussels, cleaned
8 to 10 large scallops
1 squid tube, cut into rings
1/2 cup chopped parsley

Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Cook fennel until it is soft, roughly 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in oregano, red-pepper flakes, and bay leaf.  Add crushed tomatoes and their juice, white wine, water, and clam juice; bring to a boil then reduce heat.  Add clams and mussels. Simmer, covered, until shells open. Add fish, squid, and shrimp to pot. Simmer, covered, until fish is opaque and shrimp are pink, around 2 to 3 minutes. Discard bay leaf and any unopened clams. Remove pot from heat and stir in parsley.   Serve immediately with a slice of focaccia or sourdough bread.

famous painted ladies

 

Sightglass coffee – one of our favourite spots in San Fran

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  I used a can of clams as the food shop didn’t have any fresh on hand.  Enjoy!

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lamb tagine – a feast for the senses! http://theculinarychase.com/2016/04/lamb-date-tagine-2/ http://theculinarychase.com/2016/04/lamb-date-tagine-2/#comments Mon, 18 Apr 2016 20:04:30 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=12389 A tagine, the conical shaped cooking vessel, is traditionally made out of clay and was first used by North African nomads.   The tagine’s conical top allows moisture escaping from the ingredients to condense on the lid and fall back onto the dish, resulting in fork-tender meat and vegetables using a minimum of liquid.  Think of […]

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lamb tagineA tagine, the conical shaped cooking vessel, is traditionally made out of clay and was first used by North African nomads.   The tagine’s conical top allows moisture escaping from the ingredients to condense on the lid and fall back onto the dish, resulting in fork-tender meat and vegetables using a minimum of liquid.  Think of a slow cooker or Dutch oven.  The food inside the tagine is meant to be served straight from it so don’t be shy, place it on the table and dig in!  My first discovery eating from this exotic-looking dish was 10 years ago.  It was strange for me to see dried fruit such as dates, lemons and apricots mixed in with potatoes, chicken and other veggies but so darn delicious with spices such as cinnamon, smoked paprika, cumin etc.  I couldn’t get the flavors out of my mind and since then have dabbled with mixing meat or poultry with a bit of dried fruit.

Two weeks ago I passed by a cooking shop and there, in the window, was a brilliant red tagine and they were on sale!  I have been wanting one for a long time.  You can use a tagine on a stove top or in the oven.  When looking to buy, the pretty colored ones are not suitable for cooking but can be used to display the food.  Personally, I’d stick with the plain old clay ones and not have the hassle of removing the food.  It’s recommended to season the tagine for first use by rubbing inside the base and lid with olive oil then place in a cool oven.  Set temperature to 300f (150c) and leave for 2 hours.  Looking for more recipes to try in your new tagine?  Click here, they’ll make your tummy growl!

tagine

lamb tagine
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
A tagine, the conical shaped cooking vessel, is traditionally made out of clay and was first used by North African nomads. The tagine’s conical top allows moisture escaping from the ingredients to condense on the lid and fall back onto the dish, resulting in fork-tender meat and vegetables using a minimum of liquid. Think of a slow cooker or Dutch oven. The food inside the tagine is meant to be served straight from it so don’t be shy, place it on the table and dig in!
Author:
Recipe type: stew
Cuisine: North African
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 3 lbs. boneless lamb shoulder, fat removed and cut into 1.5-inch pieces
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1½ cups chicken stock
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • pinch of saffron threads
  • ½ cup dried apricots
  • ½ cup pitted dates, sliced
  • ¼ cup flaked almonds, toasted
  • ⅓ cup fresh coriander, chopped
  • cooked couscous, to serve
Instructions
  1. Combine paprika, cumin, ginger, ground coriander and pepper in a glass or ceramic dish. Season with pepper. Add lamb and toss to coat. Cover and place in the fridge overnight to marinate.
  2. Preheat oven to 350f (180c). Transfer lamb mixture into a 10 cup oven proof dish (tagine). Stir in the stock, tomato, onion, garlic, honey, cinnamon, saffron, apricots and dates. Bake, covered, for 2½ hours or until the lamb is tender. Sprinkle stew with coriander and toasted almonds. Serve with couscous.

 

tagine ingredientsThe Culinary Chase’s Note:  When mixing the spices into the meat, make sure every piece is coated.  To make the couscous, place equal amounts of couscous and boiling water in a bowl with a tablespoon of butter.  Cover and set aside for 5 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed. Use a fork to separate the grains and season to taste.   Enjoy!

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chicken stew with olives http://theculinarychase.com/2015/10/chicken-stew-with-olives/ Tue, 13 Oct 2015 18:45:31 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=11488 Four weeks ago today we were cruising the Bosphorus River, listening to the historical commentary about Turkey and how this river has influenced its shores. As I sit here reminiscing of our trip, it feels as though it was eons ago.  All the planning, research, initial deposit to final payment, and the excitement leading up […]

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chicken stew with olivesFour weeks ago today we were cruising the Bosphorus River, listening to the historical commentary about Turkey and how this river has influenced its shores. As I sit here reminiscing of our trip, it feels as though it was eons ago.  All the planning, research, initial deposit to final payment, and the excitement leading up to the final week is but a mere memory.  Our trip, though, has left us with new experiences, new friends, and lots of new memories.  When we’re in a new country, top attractions are on our hit list but so is food.  Our first country was Turkey where we stayed in Istanbul.  We had our top 10 list of things to do while there plus I had a list of food to try.  Turkish food is a cornucopia of flavors; Asian, Mediterranean, Balkan and Middle Eastern cuisines all help to infuse the Ottoman cuisine.  Most familiar of the Turkish cuisine is Turkish delight, baklava, pide, meze, dolma, kebab, pilav, stew, Turkish coffee but we ventured out of what was familiar sounding to us.

Mr. S and I made a conscious effort of not being in the tourist spots when we ate so we could get a ‘feel’ for what was local and not influenced for western palates.  Sometimes communicating in English was challenging when off the beaten path but that didn’t prevent us for ordering.  Often we would point to the food or went by pictures on the menu.  This approach worked for us in the past and didn’t fail us this time either.  We had fun and enjoyed our food.  I recently discovered what the name of some of the food we ate:  manti, imam bayildi, iskender kebab. If you ever get a chance to try these, please do, they’re absolutely scrumptious!

The following recipe is slightly adapted from Turkish Airlines Skylife magazine and was the first thing I cooked when we arrived back home.  Olives and its oil are key to Turkish cuisine and culture.  With one and a half million olive farmers, Turkey is the fifth largest producer in the world.

Serves 4
chicken pieces (drumstick, thighs etc)
1 teaspoon cumin
2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
4 cloves of garlic, sliced
small handful of parsley, roughly chopped
1 lemon, cut in 6 wedges
2 bay leaves
cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half or left whole if small
handful of green olives, pit removed
juice of a lemon
½ cup olive oil
1 cup chicken broth

my work surfaceIn a large bowl, stir to combine cumin, red pepper flakes, ginger, garlic, parsley, turmeric, lemon juice, bay leaf, olive oil, black pepper and salt.  Add chicken pieces and toss to coat.  Let rest for half an hour.

marinated chicken Preheat oven to 325f.   Empty the chicken into a large casserole dish and add the remaining ingredients.

chicken stew, ready for the ovenRoast, uncovered, for about an hour.  During the last 10 minutes, increase heat to 350f.  You may need to cook the chicken 10 minutes longer than one hour to achieve a golden brown color.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Serve this with bulgur mixed with olive oil, lemon juice, cumin and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Enjoy!

chicken stew with olives
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
The following recipe is slightly adapted from Turkish Airlines Skylife magazine and was the first thing I cooked when we arrived back home. Olives and its oil are key to Turkish cuisine and culture. With one and a half million olive farmers, Turkey is the fifth largest producer in the world.
Author:
Cuisine: Turkish
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • chicken pieces (drumstick, thighs etc)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
  • 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • small handful of parsley, roughly chopped
  • 1 lemon, cut in 6 wedges
  • 2 bay leaves
  • cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half or left whole if small
  • handful of green olives, pit removed
  • juice of a lemon
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 cup chicken broth
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, stir to combine cumin, red pepper flakes, ginger, garlic, parsley, turmeric, lemon juice, bay leaf, olive oil, black pepper and salt. Add chicken pieces and toss to coat. Let rest for half an hour.
  2. Preheat oven to 325f. Empty the chicken into a large casserole dish and add the remaining ingredients.
  3. Roast, uncovered, for about an hour. During the last 10 minutes, increase heat to 350f. You may need to cook the chicken 10 minutes longer than one hour to achieve a golden brown color.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Serve this with bulgur mixed with olive oil, lemon juice, cumin and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Enjoy!

 

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Lentil and Vegetable Stew http://theculinarychase.com/2015/01/lentil-vegetable-stew/ Thu, 22 Jan 2015 22:03:17 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=9431 Stews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes.  It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.  Lentils are slow-burning, high-fiber, and lean protein food.  Lentils have an earthy, nutty flavor and […]

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Lentil & Vegetable StewStews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes.  It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.  Lentils are slow-burning, high-fiber, and lean protein food.  Lentils have an earthy, nutty flavor and are a staple in my pantry.  Make this tonight, you’ll be glad you did!

Serves 4
olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic, chopped
4 cups hot vegetable stock
3/4 lb potatoes, peeled and diced
4 carrots, sliced
2 to 3 parsnips, sliced
2 tablespoons curry paste
1 cup red lentils, rinsed
small handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
plain yogurt, for topping

red lentilsHeat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan and cook onion and garlic over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally. Add potatoes, carrots and parsnips.  Turn up the heat and cook for 6-7 minutes, stirring, until the vegetables are golden. Stir in the curry paste, pour in vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, add the lentils, cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the lentils and vegetables are tender and the sauce has thickened. Stir in most of the coriander, season and heat for a minute or so. Top with yogurt and coriander.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Make sure vegetables are cut in similar size to ensure even cooking.  Enjoy!

Lentil and Vegetable Stew
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Stews can take a while to cook but this lentil and vegetable stew can be ready in 35 minutes. It’s loaded to the brim with vitamin and mineral goodness and will fill you up and keep you satiated for hours.
Author:
Recipe type: stew
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • ¾ lb potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 4 carrots, sliced
  • 2 to 3 parsnips, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons curry paste
  • 1 cup red lentils, rinsed
  • small handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
Instructions
  1. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan and cook onion and garlic over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes until softened, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add potatoes, carrots and parsnips, turn up the heat and cook for 6-7 minutes, stirring, until the vegetables are golden.
  3. Stir in the curry paste, pour in the stock and then bring to the boil. Reduce the heat, add the lentils, cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the lentils and vegetables are tender and the sauce has thickened.
  4. Stir in most of the coriander, season and heat for a minute or so. Top with yogurt and coriander.
Notes
Make sure vegetables are cut in similar size to ensure even cooking. Enjoy!

 

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Turkey Stew http://theculinarychase.com/2014/10/turkey-stew/ Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:00:27 +0000 http://theculinarychase.com/?p=8597 Every Thanksgiving and Christmas we indulge in a massive turkey dinner and each year I say next time I will buy a smaller turkey with enough food for the evening and leftovers for the following day.  Every Thanksgiving and Christmas we end up having too much turkey leftover and as a result eat our way […]

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30 minute turkey stewEvery Thanksgiving and Christmas we indulge in a massive turkey dinner and each year I say next time I will buy a smaller turkey with enough food for the evening and leftovers for the following day.  Every Thanksgiving and Christmas we end up having too much turkey leftover and as a result eat our way through turkey fajita wraps, tetrazzini, jambalaya, casseroles, and chili.  A good rule of thumb to avoid having too much leftover meat is to cater one pound of turkey per person to allow for seconds and leftovers.  I will try to stick to this rule next time but truth be told, I do like using the meat in other dishes.  Turkey stew is a cinch to make and dinner will be on the table within 30 minutes.

Serves 2 to 4
cooked turkey meat, cut into chunks or pulled apart
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 tablespoon smoked paprika powder
28 oz. can tomatoes, chopped (keep juice)
1/2 teaspoon (or more) red pepper flakes
1/2 cup quinoa (rinsed under cold water)
1/2 cup parsley, chopped
1 cup sliced cabbage (purple or green)

In a large pot over medium heat add a splash of olive oil and add onion. Cook until soft. Add garlic, paprika, and red pepper flakes and sauté for about a minute. Add tomatoes and juice from the can. Stir to combine. Fill the tomato can of water and add to the pot. Stir in quinoa and cabbage. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer for 20 minutes. Add turkey meat during the last 10 minutes of the cooking time. You may need to add more liquid. Stir in parsley and serve.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Add as much turkey meat as desired. If the stew looks too dry, add more liquid.   Use rice in lieu of quinoa if you don’t have it on hand.  This stew is loaded with vitamins and minerals. Enjoy!

Turkey Stew
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Too much turkey on hand after Thanksgiving? Try this turkey stew flavored with tomatoes and smoked paprika. It is a cinch to make and dinner will be on the table within 30 minutes.
Author:
Recipe type: stew
Serves: 2 to 4
Ingredients
  • cooked turkey meat, cut into chunks or pulled apart
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika powder
  • 28 oz. can tomatoes, chopped (keep juice)
  • ½ teaspoon (or more) red pepper flakes
  • ½ cup quinoa (rinsed under cold water)
  • ½ cup parsley, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped cabbage (purple or green)
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium heat add a splash of olive oil and add onion. Cook until soft. Add garlic, paprika, and red pepper flakes and sauté for about a minute. Add tomatoes and juice from the can. Stir to combine. Fill the tomato can of water and add to the pot. Stir in quinoa and cabbage. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer for 20 minutes. Add turkey meat during the last 10 minutes of the cooking time. You may need to add more liquid. Stir in parsley and serve.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Add as much turkey meat as desired. If the stew looks too dry, add more liquid. Use rice in lieu of quinoa if you don’t have it on hand. This stew is loaded with vitamins and minerals. Enjoy!

 

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