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Roasted Hakurei Turnips

Roasted Hakurei TurnipsI am and have been for a long time enamored with local farmers’ markets.  For those who don’t know me, I grew up in the country where my parents grew their own vegetables and later on had chickens and pigs (hobby farm, of sorts).  As much as I liked being able to walk over to the vegetable field (yep, it wasn’t a patch!) to pick or dig the veggies for the evening dinner, I did not like any of the work that went into growing and maintaining a vegetable garden.  I still don’t!

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Hasselback Potatoes

Hasselback Potato by The Culinary ChaseYears ago I would take potatoes, slice them (not all the way through), place thinly sliced onion rings and butter in between the slices.  I would season with salt and pepper, wrap in tin foil and bake in the oven.  I never knew slicing the potato in this way was referred to as Hasselback. Hasselback potatoes according to About.com were named after a Stockholm restaurant that invented them.  Placing butter or oil between the slices allowed them to fan out during the baking process.  These potatoes are a perfect side dish to a Sunday roast.

potatoes, washed and scrubbed clean (pat dry)
melted butter
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
fresh thyme leaves, optional

1) Preheat oven to 425f.
2) Make even slices in the potatoes but don’t cut all the way through.
3) Combine equal amounts of butter and olive oil and brush this mixture all over the potato. Add some of this mixture to the bottom of a baking dish. Season potatoes with salt and pepper.
4) Bake 30 minutes. Remove from oven and baste potatoes with melted butter and olive oil mixture.  Place back in the oven and bake for another 30 minutes or until the potatoes are golden crispy on the edges and easily pieced in the middle with a knife. Serve hot out of the oven sprinkled with thyme leaves.

potatoes by The Culinary ChaseThe Culinary Chase’s Note: I really wanted to use duck fat but couldn’t find any at the time. You can dress these potatoes up with grated cheese, bacon bits, sprinkling of paprika, minced garlic or keep it simple with just the above ingredients. Either way, these spuds taste de-lish. Enjoy!

Grilled Broccolini with Garlic Anchoy Sauce

broccolini with garlic anchovy sauceThe tail end of Spring is drawing to a close and thankfully the warmer weather has arrived.  And because of this, the air in our neighborhood is perfumed with food being cooked on backyard barbeques. If you don’t barbecue you almost feel left out.  When I head out to our back deck to fire up the grill, my stomach grumbles as I get a whiff of someone using their barbeque.  I love this time of year.  Broccolini is a cross between broccoli and gai lan (Chinese kale).  It’s more delicate in flavor than broccoli and can be eaten raw or lightly sautéed.

Serves 4
adapted by The Gardener & The Grill

Sauce:
1 to 2 anchovy fillets, mashed into as paste
3/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, minced
1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary leaves
1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley

2 bunches broccolini, trimmed (about 2 lbs.)
olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

broccolini on the barbieFor the sauce, whisk together all ingredients and set aside. Light your barbeque to a medium-hot fire. Place broccolini on a plate and brush with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Grill until broccolini is al dente, about 5 to 8 minutes. Remove from heat and serve with sauce.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Fresh and simple! Make sure broccolini is similar in size otherwise the larger pieces will take longer to cook and will result in the smaller ones becoming burnt.  Serve this right off the grill or at room temperature.   Summer is just around the corner…Friday, 21st of June.  Enjoy!

Daylily Petal Salad

Daylily Petal SaladHow decadent! Daylilies in a salad!  Using flowers in a dish isn’t a new thing for me but it has been a long time since I last did so.  My grandmother always had a bed of nasturtiums in her flower garden which she used in bouquets around the house and if memory serves me correctly, she ate them in a sandwich.  In the 80’s it was all the rage to make candied (sugar coated) violets, rose petals, pansy flowers etc. as beautiful decorations for desserts.

I was asked to review Cooking with Flowers and was quite excited when the book arrived.  It’s full of sweet and savoury recipes…I have already bookmarked the ones I want to try.  This salad was easy to make, fantastic flavors and made for an interesting discussion around the dinner table.  Daylilies are native to Japan, China and Korea and were mentioned in the writings of Confucius (551-479 BC).  The Chinese grew these plants for their beauty and medicinal value.

Serves 4
adapted from Cooking with Flowers

4 cups arugula (rocket)
1 avocado, pitted and sliced
petals from 6 daylilies (washed lightly and dried on paper towel)
aged Gouda, shaved (use a vegetable peeler)
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Maldon flaky sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
olive oil

dayliliesPlace arugula leaves in a bowl. Add avocado, lemon juice, splash of olive oil and daylilies. Gently toss. Arrange on a platter or individual plates and top with shaved cheese, sea salt flakes and pepper. Serve immediately.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Gorgeous! Daylily buds will keep in the fridge for several days. However, the flowers should be consumed the day they are picked for optimum freshness and taste.  The flavor of the daylily will vary but the ones we ate reminded me of slight hints of melon.  You can sauté the unopened flower buds in butter or olive oil and sprinkle sea salt over them.  Enjoy!

Coleslaw with Granny Smith Apple and Chili

easy to make coleslawWarmer weather brings out all our favorite recipes for barbecues, family picnics and when it gets too darn hot to cook in the kitchen!  Everyone has their favorite coleslaw recipe that perhaps their mom or grandmother used but this one, for me, takes the blue ribbon at a state fair hands down!  Coleslaw gets its origins from the Dutch – koosla (from kool cabbage and sla salad).  Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A.  For more information on the health benefits of cabbage, click here.

Serves 6
inspired by Charred & Scruffed

green cabbage, thinly sliced (about 6 handfuls)
1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons sugar

dressing –
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt
1/4 cup rice vinegar
1 tablespoon caraway seeds, toasted in a small skillet and finely ground
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 Granny Smith apples, halved, cored, and cut into julienne (skin left on)
1 red chili pepper, thinly sliced (remove seeds and membrane)
1/2 cup fresh dill, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

cabbage apple chiliCombine cabbage and bell pepper in a large bowl and mix well. Toss with the sugar and allow to macerate for 15 minutes. For the dressing, combine all the ingredients until smooth. Don’t worry if there are a few lumps as this will break up later on. Add the apples, chili pepper, dill, and parsley to the cabbage and peppers and mix well. Toss with the dressing to coat and serve.

pretty veggies before dressingThe Culinary Chase’s Note: For increased flavor, place slaw in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.  Enjoy!