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About The Culinary Chase

The Culinary Chase was coined by my husband whilst in a coffee shop in Hong Kong back in 2006. We wanted something that would be a play on my last name and by the time we finished our coffee, the name was born. As long as I can remember I’ve enjoyed cooking. It wasn’t until we moved to Asia that I began to experiment using herbs and spices in my everyday cooking. Not only do they enhance the flavor of food but also heighten it nutritionally. “let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” - Hippocrates

Author Archive | The Culinary Chase

homemade rhubarb gin – a delicious cocktail!

DIY rhubarb gin

Gin is not a favorite liquor of mine and not because I had a bad experience when I was younger.  I never liked how it smelled or tasted.  However, all that changed last year when we were at the farmers’ market.  Steinhart Distillery had a table set up displaying their vodka and gin.  I was asked if I wanted to try their gin.  My facial expression gave me away.  The man behind the table started to talk about the botanicals in their gin and that peaked my interest.  On the first sniff, juniper berries grabbed my nose followed by a slight hint of pine and a small sip of the gin hadn’t been at all what I had remembered.  Continue Reading →

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salad with fried halloumi

salad topped with fried halloumiHalloumi, a Cypriot cheese made from a mixture of goat and sheep milk, has a high melting point and can easily be fried, grilled or roasted.  When fried or grilled, it develops a delicious crust that surrounds a slightly springy, mild interior that squeaks between your teeth when chewed!  Its uses are so versatile: skewer cheese chunks and place on a grill (brush with olive oil), make halloumi fries, wrap in prosciutto (grill or pan-fry), sliced and added to baked peppers, or shrimp and halloumi skewers with mint salsa. Continue Reading →

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focaccia di Recco (stuffed Italian flatbread)

focaccia di recco (Italian flatbread)Most people have eaten focaccia famous around the world from Liguria, Italy but I’ll bet a pound to a penny few have tried the version from Recco (a town near Genoa).  Yours truly is one of those who most defintely haven’t sampled and what a tragedy!  I was checking my Instagram feed and saw a photo of someone eating focaccia di recco.  At first, I thought it was a pizza.  After searching the web I found a few recipes.  I wasn’t pleased with the first attempt as I felt the extra-virgin olive oil amount was too much.  Continue Reading →

panna cotta with raspberry jelly

panna cotta with jellyTraditionally, panna cotta, is served on a plate by unmolding a ramekin.  If this is your first time making this Italian dessert, my recipe elimates the unmolding.  I remember the first time I made this and the mold, for some reason, did not set all the way through.  Perhaps the gelatin didn’t dissolve completely.  Get creative and use any glass you like, even tea cups!  This dessert is light enough to serve after a heavy meal and making it ahead allows for more time with your friends and family. Continue Reading →

fish wellington – a dinner party hit!

fish wellington - light & delicateWe have Julia Child to thank for making beef Wellington popular.  The dish was aired in 1965 on a New Year’s day broadcast.  I have eaten it maybe two or three times during my adult life; I enjoyed it but sometimes the meat was overcooked and when buying in a restauarnt, it isn’t cheap.  It was always considered a posh dish to serve your guests. Continue Reading →

black garlic – a labour of love

black garlic, sweet & mildLast year I saw a post on Instagram talking about black garlic.  My initial thought was EWW.  How could this be a good thing and how could chefs rave about it?  Surely this was some sort of crazy food fad.  For me, if veggies look dark, then they’re most probably rotten.  But a quick glance on the web and I found the Koreans have been fermenting garlic for years.  They age it for at least 30 days.  That seemed like too much hard work and never gave it another thought, that was, until… Continue Reading →

roasted radishes – so pretty!

roasted radishes - so mild & deliciousIf you follow me on Instagram, you’ve most probably seen a few photos I’ve taken Saturday mornings at our local farmers’ market.  It’s a perfect way to connect with vendors who earn their living off the land and it’s inspiration for me deciding what to make for dinner that night.  I always find something new.  Continue Reading →

how to cook a lobster – it’s easier than you think!

how to cook a lobsterLobster season is now open and the shop near us, Wayne’s World Lobster, opened its doors last Thursday.  Heading there to pick out our lobster was a fond reminder of my childhood.  Twice a year (possibly 3) my parents would drive to a lobster pound and choose the ones they would take home.  Sometimes my dad would go alone and he always brought back periwinkles, clams, and on occasion, scallops.  It was a real treat and my dad always cooked and cut up the lobster.  Continue Reading →

fresh mozzarella, sweet cherry peppers and arugula pie

pizza made with no-knead doughFlatbreads have been consumed by the ancient Egyptians, Romans and Greeks.  The humble pizza/pie (an expanded version of a flatbread), became popular in the USA in the mid-1900s when the Neapolitans came over for factory jobs.  According to history.com, the first documented pizzeria was Lombardi’s in Manhattan, licensed to sell pizza in 1905 and is still in operation.  Loads of people love pizza but making your own can be tricky.  The dough is key and can make it a wonderful or just so-so eating experience. Continue Reading →

double chocolate chip parfait – how to use a failed recipe

double chocolate chip parfaitIt happens.  Cooks of all levels have experienced a failed recipe at least once, maybe more.  The thing is, a failed recipe has room for improvement and making it into something better the next time around.  That’s how we discover things, through trial and error.  Continue Reading →