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artichoke pesto

artichoke pestoMaking use of what’s in your cupboard before expiration date always feels good.  I am guilty, at times, of having to throw food out.  According to Second Harvest, Canadians waste $31 billion of food every year of which 47% is wasted in the home.  Over 30% of fruits and vegetables are rejected by supermarkets because they aren’t attractive enough for consumers. The primary contributor to consumer food waste is high expectations—demand for high-quality, aesthetically-pleasing food is a key factor behind the volume of food waste among consumers. I reject ugly-looking fruit or veggies when there are visible signs of spoilage.  I don’t know why I expect my food to last longer.  The refrigerator is meant to prolong the life of fruits and vegetables and perhaps psychologically I have time on my side and, regrettably, that isn’t always the case – mea culpa

I had an opened large jar of marinated artichokes sitting in the refrigerator.  For weeks I kept pushing the jar around to make room for other food items and yesterday I finally decided to make an effort to use the remaining artichokes.  My mind wondered and then it dawned on me to make artichoke pesto.  I could use it in a number of ways and not limited to one dish.  I’ve used fresh and marinated artichokes for years and my blog has over 15 recipes using this cultivated thistle.  I made this pesto to toss with tacconelli (triangle-shaped flat pasta) or use whatever pasta you have.  Pesto is perfect as a base for pizza, as a dip, mixed with mashed potato, in a pasta salad, thinned out with olive oil to make a dressing, in soup or spread on a crostini. Making pesto is a personal thing. Some prefer a garlicky-cheesy taste while others enjoy the flavor of basil to shine.  This recipe does not use basil so adjust according to your palate.

artichoke pesto
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Pesto is perfect as a base for pizza, as a dip, mix in with mashed potato, in a pasta salad, thinned out with olive oil to make a dressing, in soup or spread on a crostini. Making pesto is a personal thing. Some prefer a garlicky-cheesy taste while others enjoy the flavor of basil to shine. This recipe does not use basil so adjust according to your palate.
Author:
Recipe type: sauce
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 1¼ cups
Ingredients
  • 2 – 3 cloves of garlic
  • large handful rocket (arugula)
  • 6 or more marinated artichoke hearts
  • fresh lemon juice, to taste
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese or pecorino
  • ½ cup pine nuts
  • ¼ to ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
Instructions
  1. Place garlic, rocket, artichoke hearts and pine nuts in a food processor and pulse until combined. While motor is running, slowly pour in olive oil (pour in ¼ cup first and go from there). Scrape sides and squeeze a bit of lemon juice and pulse to combine. Add Parmesan in increments, stir to combine, and adjust the ingredients as you see fit.

 

artichoke pesto ingredientspestoThe Culinary Chase’s Note:   Any leftover pesto, spoon into a jar and cover the top with olive oil.  This will keep for up to one week.  Enjoy!

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