Zucchini Goat Cheese Bruschetta

Zucchini & Goat Cheese BruschettaBruschetta (pronounced brusketta), is an Italian antipasto where grilled slices of bread are rubbed with garlic and a splash of olive oil added.  Who would have thought a simple Tuscan recipe of grilled bread could turn out to be so magical.  Variations of bruschetta depend on where one is in Italy.  In Naples you’ll find it topped with chopped tomatoes, oregano or basil.  In Calabria, bell peppers and oregano is added but if you’re a fan of truffle and are in Alba, try a bit of shaved truffle.  Every city has it’s own way of serving this appetizer.  Other versions are served with zucchini, eggplant, mushrooms, bell peppers and with different cheeses.  Try my zucchini and goat cheese bruschetta – it’s an irresistible version with enough substance to keep you satiated until the next course.

Serves 4 to 6
rustic bread, sliced
soft goat cheese
olive oil
1 small clove of garlic, minced
handful Italian parsley leaves, finely chopped
1 zucchini, washed
white balsamic vinegar or white wine vinegar
lemon zest

Using a potato peeler, peel strips from the zucchini and place in a bowl. Add a splash of olive oil, vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine and let sit a few minutes – this will soften the zucchini making it more pliable. In the meantime, add cheese to a bowl and a tablespoon or so of olive oil – just enough to make the cheese more spreadable. Add a teaspoon of lemon zest, garlic, parsley leaves, and stir to combine.

Toast bread either under the broiler or in a toaster. Spread the goat cheese mixture on the slices of bread and top with the zucchini ribbons.  Scatter with chopped parsley and serve immediately.

The Culinary Chase’s Note:  Use green zucchini or yellow or a combination of both.  Enjoy!

Zucchini Goat Cheese Bruschetta
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 4 to 6
Ingredients
  • rustic bread, sliced
  • soft goat cheese
  • olive oil
  • 1 small clove of garlic, minced
  • handful Italian parsley leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 zucchini, washed
  • white balsamic vinegar or white wine vinegar
  • lemon zest
Instructions
  1. Using a potato peeler, peel strips from the zucchini and place in a bowl. Add a splash of olive oil, vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine and let sit a few minutes – this will soften the zucchini making it more pliable. In the meantime, add cheese to a bowl and a tablespoon or so of olive oil – just enough to make the cheese more spreadable. Add a teaspoon of lemon zest, garlic, parsley leaves, and stir to combine.
  2. Toast bread either under the broiler or in a toaster. Spread the goat cheese mixture on the slices of bread and top with the zucchini ribbons. Scatter with chopped parsley and serve immediately.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Use green zucchini or yellow or a combination of both. Enjoy!

 

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Turkey Stew

30 minute turkey stewEvery Thanksgiving and Christmas we indulge in a massive turkey dinner and each year I say next time I will buy a smaller turkey with enough food for the evening and leftovers for the following day.  Every Thanksgiving and Christmas we end up having too much turkey leftover and as a result eat our way through turkey fajita wraps, tetrazzini, jambalaya, casseroles, and chili.  A good rule of thumb to avoid having too much leftover meat is to cater one pound of turkey per person to allow for seconds and leftovers.  I will try to stick to this rule next time but truth be told, I do like using the meat in other dishes.  Turkey stew is a cinch to make and dinner will be on the table within 30 minutes.

Serves 2 to 4
cooked turkey meat, cut into chunks or pulled apart
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves of garlic, sliced
1 tablespoon smoked paprika powder
28 oz. can tomatoes, chopped (keep juice)
1/2 teaspoon (or more) red pepper flakes
1/2 cup quinoa (rinsed under cold water)
1/2 cup parsley, chopped
1 cup sliced cabbage (purple or green)

In a large pot over medium heat add a splash of olive oil and add onion. Cook until soft. Add garlic, paprika, and red pepper flakes and sauté for about a minute. Add tomatoes and juice from the can. Stir to combine. Fill the tomato can of water and add to the pot. Stir in quinoa and cabbage. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer for 20 minutes. Add turkey meat during the last 10 minutes of the cooking time. You may need to add more liquid. Stir in parsley and serve.

The Culinary Chase’s Note: Add as much turkey meat as desired. If the stew looks too dry, add more liquid.   Use rice in lieu of quinoa if you don’t have it on hand.  This stew is loaded with vitamins and minerals. Enjoy!

Turkey Stew
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Too much turkey on hand after Thanksgiving? Try this turkey stew flavored with tomatoes and smoked paprika. It is a cinch to make and dinner will be on the table within 30 minutes.
Author:
Recipe type: stew
Serves: 2 to 4
Ingredients
  • cooked turkey meat, cut into chunks or pulled apart
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika powder
  • 28 oz. can tomatoes, chopped (keep juice)
  • ½ teaspoon (or more) red pepper flakes
  • ½ cup quinoa (rinsed under cold water)
  • ½ cup parsley, chopped
  • 1 cup chopped cabbage (purple or green)
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium heat add a splash of olive oil and add onion. Cook until soft. Add garlic, paprika, and red pepper flakes and sauté for about a minute. Add tomatoes and juice from the can. Stir to combine. Fill the tomato can of water and add to the pot. Stir in quinoa and cabbage. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer for 20 minutes. Add turkey meat during the last 10 minutes of the cooking time. You may need to add more liquid. Stir in parsley and serve.
Notes
The Culinary Chase’s Note: Add as much turkey meat as desired. If the stew looks too dry, add more liquid. Use rice in lieu of quinoa if you don’t have it on hand. This stew is loaded with vitamins and minerals. Enjoy!

 

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Fried Green Tomato Sandwich

fried green tomato sandwichAlthough fried green tomatoes (no, I’m not referring to the movie) might be a dish hailing from the southern United States, in the Maritimes we enjoy them, too.  My father loved the sight of green tomatoes in our vegetable patch.  His favorite way to eat them?  Fried with bacon and eggs, of course! Continue Reading →

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